skip navigation
New Hampshire Department of Environmental Services
PUBLIC GOVERNMENT BUSINESS A to Z LIST

Hampton-Seabrook Estuary Restoration Compendium
The Hampton-Seabrook Estuary Restoration Compendium Adobe Acrobat Reader Symbolis a compilation of information on the historic and current distributions of salt marsh and sand dune habitats and diadromous fishes within the Hampton-Seabrook Estuary Watershed. Developed by Alyson Eberhardt and Dave Burdick of the UNH Jackson Estuarine Lab with funding from the NHCP and the New Hampshire Estuaries Project, the compendium is a tool to help communities and organizations restore sand dunes, salt marsh, and diadromous fish in the Hampton-Seabrook Estuary Watershed.
The Hampton-Seabrook Estuary Restoration Compendium presents:

  • A narrative describing the methods used and the results of analyses.
  • A series of maps detailing change in sand dune and salt marsh extent over time.
  • The current and historic distribution of seven target diadromous fish species.
  • Identifies examples of prominent restoration opportunities within the Hampton-Seabrook Estuary Watershed.

For those with GIS capabilities, the ArcMap 9.2 project files, associated data files, and metadata can be accessed by contacting the NHCP.

All maps have been saved in Adobe Acrobat Reader Adobe Acrobat Reader Symbolformat and are available for viewing and download.

  • Figure 1, Project Area
  • Figure 3, Historic and Current Salt Marsh Extent
  • Figure 4, Salt Marsh Impacts and Restoration Opportunities
  • Figure 5, Historic and Current Salt Marsh Extent
  • Figure 6, Salt Marsh Impacts and Restoration Opportunities
  • Figure 7, Dune Loss Over Time
  • Figure 8, Historic and Current Dune Extent
  • Figure 9, Dune Restoration Opportunities
  • Figure 10, Current Dune Community Types
  • Figure 11, Historic and Current Distribution of Alewife and Blueback Herring
  • Figure 12, Historic and Current Distribution of American Shad
  • Figure 13, Historic and Current Distribution of Rainbow Smelt
  • Figure 14, Historic and Current Distribution of American Eel
  • Figure 15, Historic and Current Distribution of Atlantic Salmon
  • Figure 16, Historic and Current Distribution Atlantic Sturgeon
  • Figure 17, Hampton-Seabrook Estuary Restoration Opportunities Overview
  • Figure 18, Hampton-Seabrook Estuary Restoration Opportunities Tide Mill Creek and Meadow Pond
  • Figure 19, Hampton-Seabrook Estuary Restoration Opportunities Taylor River and Drake’s River
  • Figure 20, Hampton-Seabrook Estuary Restoration Opportunities Hampton Falls River-Browns River-Cains Brook
  • Figure 21, Hampton-Seabrook Estuary Restoration Opportunities Blackwater River

Great Bay Estuary Restoration Compendium
Looking for ideas on ecosystem restoration projects in the Great Bay Watershed, but don’t know where to start? Check out the Great Bay Estuary Restoration Compendium Adobe Acrobat Reader Symboldeveloped by The Nature Conservancy with funding from the NHCP and New Hampshire Estuaries Project. The Compendium is a tool to help communities and organizations restore eelgrass, salt marsh, diadromous fish, and shellfish in the Great Bay Watershed.
The Compendium has two components: a report and a GIS database. The report provides maps and detailed descriptions on areas of concern to help set future restoration goals and aid project development. With the scientific backing and expertise of years of work compiled in one place, the Compendium saves loads of research time and strengthens project grant proposals.The GIS database is packed with GIS data on past restoration projects, water quality issues, dam locations, and historic distribution areas for salt marshes, fish and oysters. With ArcView you’ll be able to customize your own set of maps by selecting the restoration data most applicable to your projects’ needs.
In mid-September, 2006, copies of the CD with GIS database and report were sent out to each coastal community.
Staff from NHCP are available to assist communities in using the Compendium.

The Stream Barrier Removal Monitoring Guide
The Stream Barrier Removal Monitoring Guide provides a framework of critical monitoring parameters for use at dam and culvert removal sites in the Gulf of Maine watershed. When analyzed collectively, eight parameters will allow restoration practitioners to document the physical, chemical, and biological effects of stream barrier removal. The parameters include monumented cross sections, longitudinal profile, grain size distribution, photo stations, water quality, riparian plant community structure, macroinvertebrates, and fish passage. The Guide presents the scientific context for barrier removal and gives detailed methods and data sheets for six parameters.
The Guide is based on the input of more than 70 scientists, natural resource managers, engineers, consultants, and staff from non-governmental organizations in Massachusetts, Maine, New Hampshire, New Brunswick, and Nova Scotia. Final review was sought from experts in barrier removal monitoring from outside the Gulf of Maine region. View the abstract and download the Guide.

 

 

Adobe Acrobat Reader Symbol Adobe Acrobat Reader format. Download a free reader from Adobe.




NH Department of Environmental Services | 29 Hazen Drive | PO Box 95 | Concord, NH 03302-0095
(603) 271-3503 | TDD Access: Relay NH 1-800-735-2964 | Hours: M-F, 8am-4pm

copyright 2014. State of New Hampshire